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February 19, 2015 / basabbott

United We Stand

Review

United We Stand

Townsend Productions

Diss Corn Hall

The shades lengthen from the Heath government. Its corruption is just reaching us like messages from deep space.

When that haughty PM talked of creating one nation he seemed as distant as a Klingon from the people.

The dubious prosecution of the Shrewsbury flying pickets dates from his time. Like the Catholic church, the unions only make news when it is bad.

‘Breaking the power of the unions’ was the government fighting the people, as with Thatcher and the miners.

Neil Gore’s two-hander, which he plays with William Fox, claims that the conspiracy was on the part of the establishment, not the workers. The prosecutions could still be quashed.

The actors are vigorous and impassioned as they tell and sing the story. The way they alternate as counsel and witness in the courtroom scene is electric. So too are their final speeches in the dock.

More than 40 years on, with corruption still rife, Louise Townsend’s production is almost contemporary.

Basil Abbott

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